STORIES: Somalia: The girls of Mogadishu are heading back to the beach: The girls of Mogadishu are heading back to the beach

Some militiamen are seen on a technical. The term technical, which originated in Somalia in the early 1990s, describes a light, impromptu fighting vehicle, typically an open-backed civilian pickup truck with a machine gun mounted on it, or carrying armed men. Security in Somalia remains volatile, and it is one of the most lucrative businesses. Non-governmental organizations, journalists, politicians, entrepreneurs and the people of the diaspora hire local gunmen to move through the streets, using money defined as {quote}technical assistance grants{quote}. The car bombs, the suicide attacks, the journalists murdered and the mortar rounds fired during the night against Villa Somalia are proof that while Al-Shabaab may have lost its urban strongholds, it has not been defeated. From a struggle for position fought out on the battlefield, the movement has shifted towards a new underground, asymmetric, Al-Qaeda-style strategy aimed at heightening the sense of insecurity and instability afflicting a population already drained by twenty-five years of fighting and famine.
The girls of Mogadishu are heading back to the beach

Some militiamen are seen on a technical. The term technical, which originated in Somalia in the early 1990s, describes a light, impromptu fighting vehicle, typically an open-backed civilian pickup truck with a machine gun mounted on it, or carrying armed men. Security in Somalia remains volatile, and it is one of the most lucrative businesses. Non-governmental organizations, journalists, politicians, entrepreneurs and the people of the diaspora hire local gunmen to move through the streets, using money defined as "technical assistance grants".

The car bombs, the suicide attacks, the journalists murdered and the mortar rounds fired during the night against Villa Somalia are proof that while Al-Shabaab may have lost its urban strongholds, it has not been defeated. From a struggle for position fought out on the battlefield, the movement has shifted towards a new underground, asymmetric, Al-Qaeda-style strategy aimed at heightening the sense of insecurity and instability afflicting a population already drained by twenty-five years of fighting and famine.